Patch Gold


As October slips away I have made as many attempts as possible to get out and enjoy local birding highlights and have managed to do so alongside a local bird ringer. The opportunity to see even the common birds very close up even briefly is not to be missed and gives benefits outside of the scientific ones . The first foray took place near one my local  WEBS sites and soon produced a range of small wild wonders with snappy blue tits, grumpy wrens and gorgeous goldcrests.

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Only close up do you get to see the orange hues that splits the male from the female goldcrest

As well as the opportunity to see the birds close up there is also the chance to tell with some certainty if they are this years birds and get an idea of how good a breeding season it has been and it appeared to have been a good one. In amongst the youngsters were not just blue tits and great tits but also a summer special a blackcap made its way into the gentle embrace of the mist nets before being rung measured and set free.

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Keeping an eye on proceedings and out of the nets and adult great tit

Winter visitors were also captured and alongside noisy blackbirds and a songthrush were a number of redwings part of last weeks winter return and invasion, all feeding up on the berry laden bushes and hedgerows. Out of the nets I was also pleased to see a flock of 60 teal  and a marsh tit which has been eluding me for a couple of months.

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relocated Marsh tit

Closer to home with some ringing just off the west Hethersett loop at Cedar grange we got close and personal with record numbers of reed bunting and plenty of yellow hammer. The flocks of birds were being targetted by a sparrowhawk and an opportunistic buzzard but another raptor grabbed my attention being mobbed by starlings and a crow and a new record for the village as a short eared owl circled and then flew off south Esat.

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Here in all his glory the Hethersett  Short eared owl

It is fair to say my snatched record shot doesn’t do this far travelling  hunter justice so below is a more photgenic version of this rare village visitor.

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Photo Credit: fletchlewista2 Flickr via Compfight cc

This post’s video comes from my last working trailcam which has fortunately been supplemented by a couple of new Crenova cameras so the regular updates on the you tube site should start to pick up again with a range of new wildlife offerings. I had hoped to get some grey partridges this time out but got these red legged ones instead.

Autumn walks and winter visitors


There can now be no doubt that Summer has been blown out on the back of various Atlantic Hurricanes. The village’s housemartin colony left last week and with them the warmer weather. There are still plenty of local birds who dont seem to mind the blustery and wet conditions and the local jackdaws as pictured below seem to enjoy playing in the gusty conditions across the village. At night the tawny owls are now starting to twit and twoo as their breeding season gets under way.

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Ever present Village Jackdaw  

 

With the summer gone I have been out on some of the local walks looking to the skies for winter visitors. In the gardens the blackbird and jay populations appear to be increasing, possibly already being added to by continental birds. Over on the West Hethersett Loop the winter seed crop is already attracting flocks of linnets and some yellowhammers  but no winter thrushes yet that I have seen.

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Plenty of fruit and berries locally for the winter blackbirds.

On Thursday I had a chance to take a BTO birdringer out to look at some of the local areas with loads of birds on show including one of my WEBS sites. It was a grey overcast afternoon again but as soon as we arrived on site there were small flocks of singing linnets and constant calling of Bullfinch and green woodpecker so plenty of colour amongst the grey. In the hedgerows wrens scolded and goldcrests piped their high pitch calls.

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Autumn goldcrest feeding up before the cold weather sets in.

Whilst checking out the local river and lake for the winter visiting ducks and  geese we heard a familiar and yet unfamiliar call overhead. I hadn’t heard it for months since early last spring  and soon in view were the callers, a dozen redwings. They were followed by other small flocks and signal winter is well on its way but reassuringly it will be full of new friends and old from the colder parts of Eastern Europe and Russia

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Redwings starting to fly over in their tens and hundreds.

Photo Credit: Svenni and his Icelandic birds. Flickr via Compfight cc

This morning a return to watch some actual birdringing with my very excited 10 year old assistant. We saw a haul of 35 birds of ten species including plenty of this years blue tits and great tits along with a song thrush, a couple of blackbirds, some wrens and some of those goldcrests. Perhaps most special was a female bullfinch as they are often heard rarely seen and a young chiffchaff  who will be over wintering in the UK instead of flying south with its parents.

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Commonest on the day and very feisty Blue tit complete with new ankle bling.

This posts video offering is of a couple of nocturnal visitors to the local patch but with recent reports of big cats in the area who knows what will be on the next post.

Autumn surprises


It is over a week ago that a solitary swift drifted south across my garden marking the last of his kind until next summer for me. Always a sad and sudden end to summer days and this week I have watched swallows and housemartins fattening up on the wing as they follow behind and there were still a couple lingering at Marlingford today but none in Hethersett that I have seen.

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Going but not forgotten Housemartin heading south.

Photo Credit: Tim Melling Flickr via Compfight cc

The local lakes are starting to fill with early winter visitors, if not with water and my most recent WEBS count saw the return of our smallest duck the teal in good numbers along with wintering flocks of lapwings and tufted ducks. Also present on the islands left larger than normal by the low water levels were 220 roosting greylag geese and making them look a little smaller a great black-backed gull preening himself and keeping an eye on the young moorhens as potential snacks.

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Young Moorhen or Potential Gull food.

 

Whilst Autumn is rolling in some local highlights have included some special birds that tend to make headlines in Spring when they are easiest to see and hear. Lesser spotted woodpeckers usually draw a crowd and the latest local spot that can cope with a few extra well behaved birdwatchers is Ladybelt Country Park. The park which has featured previously on this blog has its own regularly updated wildlife sightings blog which can be accessed (HERE) if you want to read more about the park and its birds.  

Lady belt runs with the help of volunteers as does the Hethersett county wildlife site at Beckhithe Meadow which saw some frantic activity clearing ponds and bramble on the last weekend of August with an overnight moth trap being examined before any work was done. Thanks to Matt Casey who was on hand to confirm ID’s we got to see a very early Sallow moth and a sure sign that Autumn is on its way.

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Sallow showing off the colours which highlight it as an Autumn moth

Photo Credit: Ashley Beolens Flickr via Compfight cc

Once again the usual video highlight for the post is missing due to ongoing technical issues so I leave you with a picture from a recent Breckland outing which gave opportunities to capture one of the villages usually shy and elusive residents.

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Muntjac one of the areas most common deer

August Tonics.


August is with us and it is a time when birds become harder to find with many starting to moult and hide away skulking in the hedgerows. Now you need to get up with the lark for the best chance to catch up with our feathered friends as they are more active at the break of day. This week I took a number of young assistants for a camp out on Beckhithe Meadow to make the most of the dawn activity as well as the nocturnal stuff. Our first surprise was no however a bird but a very striking spider.

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Wasp spider unmistakeable but harmless.

The wasp spider is a relative newcomer to the UK and is spreading slowly North but predominantly found in the South of the country. Male wasp spiders are smaller than this female and have to tread carefully around their mate choosing only to mate when she is emerging into adult form and her fangs are hopefully too soft to eat him. After the spider we sat down to campfire and marshmallows with an evening serenade of tawny owls and little owls.

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Sleepy Tawny Owl presumably having sung us to sleep and woken us at about 5.00 am

In the morning the local birds were all active moving from tree to tree and around the meadow as they found their breakfast. The most common bird was not the expected Village classic the woodpigeon but the Goldfinch with a charm of 30 flitting around the meadow and feeding on thistle down. Other finches were well represented with linnets and bullfinches although the latter stayed out of sight most of the time.

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Goldfinch hiding on the tree tops between feeding.

Some of the summer visitors were on show with families of whitethroats and calling chiffchaff amongst the trees. In one of the large oaks a robin sang and a songthrush sunbathed. Flocks of blue, great and long-tailed tits foraged and a great spotted woodpecker flew in to the tree tops and also foraged with them appearing not to be a threat  to them now they are all mobile and grown up.

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female great spotted woodpecker whose nestling snatching is over for another year.

As well as some morning meadow watching I have also carried out this months WEBS surveys locally and the highlights have been close up views of hunting kingfishers but the images of those will be mine alone as I hadnt taken the camera. I had hoped pehaps to see a passage wader or two but only a single common sandpiper showed itself. in fact there was very little to show at all with no ducks or geese other than a couple of sleeping Egyptian geese.

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The kingfisher photo I might have taken had my camera been handy.

Photo Credit: jean-lucfoucret Flickr via Compfight cc

With the many birds  missing (although I did later find 180 missing lapwing on some local fields) I thought I would try my hand at Identifying some flowers which are much easier to see in August. My ID’s are beginners so if they are wrong let me know and I can get them right next time.

Herb Robert

Herb Robert

Arguably the prettiest little flower was what I believe is herb Robert used traditionally to treat headaches, nosebleeds and as a tonic for a stomach upset as well as an antiseptic and a mosquito repellent.

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Agrimony

This delicate stem of flowers if I have correctly ID’d is agrimony a herb apparently ideal for healing musket wounds and warding of witchcraft. Perhaps its most useful folklore property is that if placed under the pillow of a sleeping person they will not wake up until it is removed. Worth remembering for new parents I imagine.

Knapweed

Knapweed

My final offering of  the post is knapweed which is a very robust yet attractive flower with a variety of medicinal uses including assisting with bruises, sores, scabs and sore throats. According to folklore a woman could also place it in her blouse and use it to detect the man of her dreams when its petals opened. Moral for August is if you fail to see the birds, have a look and see what else is lurking that may do you some good.

Wood warbler and other July highlights


Wow where did July go? I was just getting used to keeping my new bird bath topped up during, the usual, hottest temperatures ever recorded and it is nearly over. The month has also brought out the usual annual avian highlight of seagull abuse and tales of eaten dogs in the national press. Fear not however villagers, whilst there more lesser blackbacked gulls are to be seen and heard at  this time of year none of them have been reported as eating dogs or small children.

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Lesser Blackbacked gull on the look out for a small canine snack

The hot weather has also meant that the local buzzards have again been spectacular over the village and drawn the usual attention from the local crows and last week I noticed them attracting mobs of swifts shadowing their activities. I cant belive that the buzzards present a threat to agile swifts but I guess the fact that they are a predator is enough to draw a reaction.

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Jet Black village Carrion Crow threatened by very little outside of Buzzards.

This months local surveying was done early, along with some assistance provided by myself and a number of hard working accomplices young and old at the county wildlife site at Beckhithe Meadow (Click HERE to read about the highlights of the latter). Out on the local lakes the last of the awaited broods of youngsters hit the water with young tufted ducks like crazy black pom poms out on the water with their parents whilst the common tern chicks had fledged and followed their parents begging for food,

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Proud father , Tufted duck.

Whilst out checking the ducks I bumped into one of the relatively trusted regulars who dropped into conversation that they had heard a wood warbler singing not far away but had not seen it for a few days. After my recent delight at hearing  a quail on the same patch I wasn’t going to be blessed with another rare singer so leave you with this video highlighting what is  one of my favourite songsters.

Quail and other June highlights


June in the village has mostly been rainy as far as I can tell in between working. I now have something akin to a jungle in the back garden and there may well be some birds in there but they are quite difficult to locate. Fly over birds though have been quite spectacular with a  red kite, a buzzard and also a  common tern .

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Record shot of the latest garden tick. Flyover Red Kite

The red kite also made a highlight of my last BBS survey of the year with a single bird low over head as I completed my Wymondham square. Alas this was the only real highlight as continued urbanisation steadily removes the wild spaces and the associated birdlife. The weather hasnt been bothering the ducks on my WEBS surveys and there have been a string of successes with gadwall, mallard and shoveller all presenting broods along with young great crested grebe, egyptian and canada geese, lapwings and oystercatchers.

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Egyptian geese with young

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Lots of mallard babies this year

Away from the ducks the wet weather has probably caused some havoc with young lives a sudden rise in water levels wiped out the majority of this years local common tern population and will have made life difficult for insect eaters especially the likes of swallows and swifts. I have been following the life of a hole in a tree this spring and after some nuthatches were driven out a pair of great spotted woodpeckers they have raise a brood with no illeffects from the weather.

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Ready to go young great spotted woodpecker

Earlier in the week I went out primarily to check some of my local WEBS sites for bats which had been out foraging most evenings and I was rewarded with three types of Pipestrelle and a noctule bats before I became distracted by a calling bird. New bird calls are always exciting and instantly leap out as unusual when you are so used to listening to the commoner species when surveying. So the Wet my lips call of a singing Quail never heard before other than on an ap was one of these special events.

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Another Great Spotted woodpecker. Damp mother caught in the recent rain. No bats or quail as they are tricky to photograph at dusk

Now the chance of a once in a lifetime sighting of a quail drew me back to my WEBS site the next morning and I started out close to where I had heard the bird the night before and took in a count of the usual species of moorhen, grey heron, mallard and kingfishers which darted backwards and  forwards  with piping calls. I was also treated to a couple of pairs of breeding reed bunting which I hadn’t previously seen in the area.

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Moorhen not my target species just one of the locals

Quail are migrant birds flying in from Africa every year (click here for more details) and they are notoriously difficult to locate throwing their call and being small and brown hiding in long grass so it was no surprise that it took two and a half hours of patient tracking and then waiting before I managed to get a glimpse of the bird when he briefly came out into the open. Alas a singing bird in June almost certainly means no mate but perhaps next year although they have not been recorded locally in living memory.

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No quail again as he was too quick, but a very pleasant bee orchid from the quail field.

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No still no quail but one of sevral painted lady butterflies another African migrant fromthe Quail field and cropping up around the village

 

Of swifts and things


The first swift of the year hung on an invisible thread over my back garden last Friday and gave my gardening the once over before moving on. The first sighting of the year is always a special moment like catching up with a special friend you just see in the summer holidays. By the weekend the first village birds had arrived screaming and wheeling and they join the Admirals Way house martins and the swallows at Wong Farm for those that need an excuse to get out for some summer walks.

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Swallow numbers appear down on last year but still enough to make a summer

Recent surveying which has filled my time with nature if not with blogging has been spectacular with a range of migrants and oddities on patches to add the unusual to the ever present beauty. The fields off Market Lane have been bursting with wildlife as well as the glorious blooms of rape flowers,

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Yellow flowers and blue skies perfect for surveying.

Bird populations seemed healthy with singing skylarks in every field along with linnets and yellowhammers. Wrens stayed hidden but bashed out their high octane trilling tunes accompanied by chaffinches, whitethroats, blackbirds and blackcaps. As is often the case the skies were also graced with flyover common terns and cormorant not exactly farmland birds but keeping the fish on their toes in the local ponds and reservoir. perhaps the most unlikely bird of the rape fields was a pair of ever present barnacle geese.

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Barnacle goose not the typical Norfolk bird of farm or field.

Recent WEBS counts have also revealed nice local highlights with breeding lapwings with chicks just hatched and oystercatchers, great crested grebes and plenty of blackheaded gulls to stop the Lesser black backed gulls from getting to comfortable. A pair of little ringed plover was also good to see but they appeared to be getting hassled by a trio of yobbish jackdaws which may prevent them nesting.

Favourite photo of the last few weeks is the following one which has taken much patience to get even this record shot of one of the local badger cubs. Shortly after they came within inches of me clearly oblivious of humans at this early stage in their life and didn’t see me as a threat just a curiosity.

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This posts video is of course also badger cub related as they make such great subjects clearly all full of energy and love of life.