November Daylight Highlights


With the days counting down fast to the longest night, actually getting some daylight and the daytime wildlife highlights is challenging for those like me with busy jobs. But getting out is worth its weight in gold to revive any flagging wellbeing. Last weekend saw an early rise to help set out the mist nets on Cedar Grange on the west of the village. This area is now perfect as a place to take in the sights and sounds of farmland birds worthy of yesteryear. Aside from an early singing robin there wasn’t much moving before the nets went up.

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Robin keen to get the early worm.

There was slight frost as the sun broke over the winter seed crop and lit up the Autumn oak trees and hedgerows and a lingering mist across the top of the millet stalks. slowly the small flocks of early linnets began to appear  from the surrounding trees and hedgerows followed by some fly over redwings and chuckling fieldfare. Very quickly the nets filled with other early risers, yellowhammers by the dozen , chaffinches, dunnocks, wrens and the special winter visitor the reed bunting.

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Male reed bunting starting to show his breeding colours

I also managed a similar expedition at nearby Great Melton which has another of the winter seed crops. Again the morning soon woke to the sounds of the early songsters with a robin singing its slightly mournful sub-song and he was quickly joined by singing flocks of linnets brought in by the seed crop. A quick scan of the treetops soon revealed plenty of other farmland birds also thriving including yellow hammer and reedbunting and also a strange white finch. On close examination this turned out to be a leuchistic linnet. Leuchism is similar to albinism but is not the same with birds showing feathers without pigment to a greater or lesser degree but not with other albino features such as pink eyes.

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Clearly bigger than a linnet, this is a leachistic red kite showing the added white feathers not present on a typical bird

Photo Credit: karen leah Flickr via Compfight cc

Whilst my white linnet stayed well out of camera range I shall have to make do with the photo above to show the effect and also to segway into my next stroll which took me even further afield to Marlingford where I carried out some wetland surveys. The wetland birds were a bit thin on the ground with a lonely little egret  and a calling kingfisher the highlights on a dimming afternoon until a pair of standard red kites spent half an hour calling and quartering above my head.

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Typical red kite and highlight of the shortest or darkest of days

Unfortunately there is no video treat for this post due to some annoying you tube glitch but check back next week as December sunny days have already filled up with some outstanding visits from winter guests and highlights.

Patch Gold


As October slips away I have made as many attempts as possible to get out and enjoy local birding highlights and have managed to do so alongside a local bird ringer. The opportunity to see even the common birds very close up even briefly is not to be missed and gives benefits outside of the scientific ones . The first foray took place near one my local  WEBS sites and soon produced a range of small wild wonders with snappy blue tits, grumpy wrens and gorgeous goldcrests.

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Only close up do you get to see the orange hues that splits the male from the female goldcrest

As well as the opportunity to see the birds close up there is also the chance to tell with some certainty if they are this years birds and get an idea of how good a breeding season it has been and it appeared to have been a good one. In amongst the youngsters were not just blue tits and great tits but also a summer special a blackcap made its way into the gentle embrace of the mist nets before being rung measured and set free.

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Keeping an eye on proceedings and out of the nets and adult great tit

Winter visitors were also captured and alongside noisy blackbirds and a songthrush were a number of redwings part of last weeks winter return and invasion, all feeding up on the berry laden bushes and hedgerows. Out of the nets I was also pleased to see a flock of 60 teal  and a marsh tit which has been eluding me for a couple of months.

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relocated Marsh tit

Closer to home with some ringing just off the west Hethersett loop at Cedar grange we got close and personal with record numbers of reed bunting and plenty of yellow hammer. The flocks of birds were being targetted by a sparrowhawk and an opportunistic buzzard but another raptor grabbed my attention being mobbed by starlings and a crow and a new record for the village as a short eared owl circled and then flew off south Esat.

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Here in all his glory the Hethersett  Short eared owl

It is fair to say my snatched record shot doesn’t do this far travelling  hunter justice so below is a more photgenic version of this rare village visitor.

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Photo Credit: fletchlewista2 Flickr via Compfight cc

This post’s video comes from my last working trailcam which has fortunately been supplemented by a couple of new Crenova cameras so the regular updates on the you tube site should start to pick up again with a range of new wildlife offerings. I had hoped to get some grey partridges this time out but got these red legged ones instead.